Astronauts Capture Haunting Video of Hurricane Florence Making Landfall From Space

Astronauts Capture Haunting Video of Hurricane Florence Making Landfall From Space

Astronauts Capture Haunting Video of Hurricane Florence Making Landfall From Space

"Do you want to get hit with a train or do you want to get hit with a cement truck?" said Jeff Byard, an administrator with the US Federal Emergency Management Agency. "You may need to move up to the second story, or to your attic, but WE ARE COMING TO GET YOU".

Utility companies said millions were expected to lose power and that restoring it could take weeks.

In one incident, a mother and infant were killed when a tree fell on their house in Wilmington.

North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper called Florence an "uninvited brute" that could wipe out entire communities as it grinds across the state.

Another reason, according to the National Hurricane Center, is that South Carolina's current forecast has Florence traveling down the coastline and heading inland near Myrtle Beach about 2 p.m. Saturday.

George Zaytoun chose not to evacuate his house ahead of the storm, which had been deemed a Category 4 hurricane on Wednesday.

North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, Washington, D.C., and Maryland have declared a state of emergency in anticipation of the storm.

The town of Oriental, North Carolina, got more than 18 inches of rain in just a few hours, while Surf City had 14 inches.

"Hurricane Florence is powerful, slow and relentless", Cooper said.

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"I had a lot of fear initially but I'm glad to be inside and safe", said Zelda Allen, 74, a retired tax accountant from Hampstead, North Carolina, who was riding out the storm at Wilmington's Hotel Ballast with her husband.

Storm surge was as high as 10 feet on the Neuse River, he said.

The 63-year-old former firefighter says he was able to sleep through the torrential rain and thrashing winds when then-Hurricane Florence made landfall early Friday morning, only waking up to texts he received at 7 a.m. from friends checking up on him.

The National Weather Center predicts another 20 to 25 inches of rain for the areas surrounding the Carolinas' border, with 30 to 40 inches in some places. Storm surge could be up to 13 feet, pushing seawater as much as 2 miles inland.

Jack Christine, the airport's deputy director of aviation, said the airport may be forced to use its crosswind runway if sustained winds reach 34 miles per hour.

At 5 a.m., the center was all but parked over SC, about 35 miles (55 kilometers) west of Myrtle Beach, moving west-southwest at just 5 mph (8 kph) and scooping massive amounts of moisture from the sea.

Baker said the rain will bring damaging flash flooding to all areas of the Wilmington region, not just low-lying areas that are particularly vulnerable. Thousands of soldiers from their National Guard forces have been mobilized.

Authorities warned, too, of the threat of mudslides and the risk of an environmental disaster from floodwaters washing over industrial waste sites and hog farms.

While forecasters have been keeping a close eye on the storm from the ground, the International Space Station watched the slow-moving hurricane make landfall from above. As of 1 p.m. ET, the storm's sustained winds dropped to 75 miles per hour as it wobbled west-southwestward near the coast, delaying its expected move inland, the National Hurricane Center said.

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